Advertising regulations

Are there advertising regulations online?

All advertising is self-regulated by different organisations working together:

• The Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) and the Broadcast Committee of Advertising Practice (BCAP) make the rules. These committees are made up of representatives of advertisers, agencies, media owners and other industry groups.

• The independent Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) makes rulings and enforces them, working with Ofcom to regulate TV and radio advertising.

If you’re interested in discovering more, the ASA publishes its decisions and provides information about its work on their website: asa.org.uk.

Time to Talk

Discuss why there are age limitations on some websites and not others. What if users say they’re older than they are? What difference might this make to the adverts they will see?

We would love to hear your views on this topic, send them to getmediasmart@vivome.com.

We would love to hear your views on this topic, or outcomes as a result of trying out the suggestion above. Please send them to getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK here.

To access free body image teaching resources, click the button below.

Source: Media Smart Body Image and Advertising: a guide for parents and guardians

Find out more:

The NSPCC provides a range of useful information including: Share Aware, a campaign for parents, offering information and advice on how to keep young people safe online. Link: nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keepingchildren-safe/share-aware

Net Aware, a research tool with detailed information about each social media platform, including the pros and cons of use. Link: net-aware.org.uk

ParentPort has been set up by the UK’s media regulators. They have joined together because they share a common purpose: to set and enforce standards across the media to protect children from inappropriate material. Link: parentport.org.uk/top-tips-for-parents/ online-safety

Insafe is a European network, comprised of 31 national awareness centres. Every centre implements awareness and educational campaigns, runs a helpline, and works closely with young people to ensure an evidence-based, multi-stakeholder approach to creating a better internet. Link: betterinternetforkids.eu

Your Online Choices is a guide to behavioural advertising, the practice based on internet browsing activity that allows brands to deliver adverts to web users which reflect their interests. It includes tips for managing the adverts you see and how to use the privacy settings on your computer. Link: youronlinechoices.com/uk

KidSMART is a website designed for children from Childnet International. Childnet is a charity set up to equip children and young people to navigate the online world safely and develop new technologies that promote and protect the rights of children. Link: childnet.com Link: kidsmart.org.uk

Parent Portal gives parents, teachers and guardians the tools they need to ensure the children in their care are safe on Facebook. It includes information and advice on what to say, when to do it and how to be a good role model, as well as offering connections to safety experts. Link: facebook.com/safety/parents

Adverts we see

How do companies know what we like?

On social media, any information we give will be used to generate adverts which are appropriate to us (based on things like our age, gender and location).

Once we’ve signed up, our actions on the platform will influence the adverts we see; including what we choose to read, like, comment on and share. This is why, when we sign up for a service, we should read the terms and conditions and think about the information we reveal online and only use age-appropriate services. We should also be aware of who the organisation is giving our details to, how it may be used in the future and how to control our privacy settings.

Once we’ve signed up, our actions on the platform will influence the adverts we see; factors include what we choose to read, like, comment on and share.

Remember…

  • Read the terms and conditions
  • Use age-appropriate services
  • Control privacy settings

Did you also know that our actions outside of the social media platform may also influence what adverts we see within it?

For example, we might see an advert in our newsfeed for something we searched for on a different website. The reason this happens is that any information we give online is fed into an algorithm, which then decides which adverts we will see in the future. However, you are able to control some of the information fed into the algorithm and aspects of the process itself. The most popular types of social media all have privacy settings that enable us to point out the system has made a mistake and shown an advert we don’t wish to see or is not suitable for us.

As our online behaviour has evolved, products and services have been created to hide user information from online algorithms and stop people seeing adverts. These are often called ‘adblockers’.Using adblockers means that sites providing content and services, at little or no cost, do not receive the money they should expect through the value exchange.

Time to talk:

Discuss how advertisers collect information about you. What information are you happy to share and what would you like to keep private?

We would love to hear your views on this topic, or outcomes as a result of trying out the suggestion above. Please send them to getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK here.

To access free body image teaching resources, click the button below.

Source: Media Smart Body Image and Advertising: a guide for parents and guardians

 

Social Media

Do we manage our own social media experience?

Social media is popular because so much of it is shaped by its users.

People can add or ‘block’ contacts and personalise their area by choosing a profile picture and sharing things they like. But some people forget that these are controlled by the companies that own them, rather than a space created entirely by the users. For example, social media platforms often reduce the amount of information they display to create space for adverts.

Time to Talk

Look at the two-word clouds – one is made up of words describing advertising and the other describes social media. What are the similarities and differences between them?

We would love to hear your views on this topic, or outcomes as a result of trying out the suggestion above. Please send them to getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK here.

To access free body image teaching resources, click the button below.

Source: Media Smart Body Image and Advertising: a guide for parents and guardians

types of adverts

What are the different types of digital advert?

There are many different types of adverts on social media, some overt and some more concealed.

The most common types of digital adverts.

Display advert: Banners above web pages and pre-roll videos, such as those that play before watching something on YouTube.

Paid-for promotion: Promoting a product or service in a post or within a social media ‘feed’.

Brand-owned content: When a brand has a social media account and uses it to engage with consumers through messaging and networking.

In-game advert: Uses virtual advertising opportunities in commercial games, such as on pitch-side signs or by product placement.

Advergames: These are games produced specifically for a brand. They are designed to get customers to come back to a brand location regularly to play the game, win prizes, share information about themselves and invite friends to play. Vlog advert: Where a video-blogger partners with a brand or company to advertise their product. Sometimes these are paid for and other times

Vlog advert: Where a video-blogger partners with a brand or company to advertise their product. Sometimes these are paid for and other times vloggers are given products for free in the hope they will talk about them.

Search advert: These adverts are based on the words put into a search engine, e.g. Google, Bing, Yahoo. They are usually among the first few results and should be labelled as an advert.

Time to Talk

Think about which of these advertising techniques are successful and why. How do companies know which adverts to use for which products and services?

We would love to hear your views on this topic, or outcomes as a result of trying out the suggestion above. Please send them to getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK here.

To access free body image teaching resources, click the button below.

Source: Media Smart Body Image and Advertising: a guide for parents and guardians

 

adverts on social media

Why are there adverts on social media?

Adverts on social media are common, they come in many different forms from company accounts to paid-for spaces, but why are they necessary?

Look in more detail at these platforms, you will see that most actually have two elements:

  1. Networking & Entertainment
  2. Paid-for-promo

1. Is the area where we spend our time.

2. Is the sponsored content which sits alongside the networking and entertainment area.

Many people do not consider both the elements and the reasons behind the existence of adverts, but it is important to recognise that when we are online, we are often seen as potential ‘consumers’. Most forms of social media is free to access, so we don’t always realise that there is a ‘value exchange’. Whether social media is free or charges subscription fees, adverts usually finance them. This is why you sometimes have to pay to have a premium non-ad version.

Companies spend a large amount of money making sure their adverts reach their target audience and have the right sort of message to appeal to them. Because social media is able to learn a lot of information about their users, it is easier for companies to reach the desired audiences. Adverts on social media can be a useful way for consumers to find out more about the products, services, and issues that interest them.

Time to Talk

What do you think are some of the positives and negatives of the value exchange outlined above? Is it good or bad that we get targeted by relevant adverts?

We would love to hear your views on this topic, or outcomes as a result of trying out the suggestion above. Please send them to getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK here.

To access free body image teaching resources, click the button below.

Source: Media Smart Body Image and Advertising: a guide for parents and guardians

social media

What is social media?

Social media allows us to communicate and share ideas with our friends for free, as part of a network or community.

There are five main types of social media:

MESSAGING

Allows users to send text, picture or video messages, in real time, to other individuals or groups.

NETWORKING

Allows users to connect and share with people who have similar interests and backgrounds.

GAMING

Games which connect to the internet now include a ‘social element’, allowing users to communicate and compete with each other.

MEDIASHARING

Allows users to share the photos and videos that they create. They also offer an interactive feature, so you can create a personal profile and comment on other people’s posts.

BLOGGING/ MICRO-BLOGGING

Allows users to share their ideas in a variety of formats including text, pictures, sound and video. Users can also include links to other information online. People who use these services are called ‘bloggers’ while those who upload video blogs are called ‘vloggers’. Microblogging platforms like Twitter limit users to short posts.

What are the most popular social media platforms?

Networking: Facebook/ LinkedIn/ Google +

Blogging/ Microblogging: Twitter

Blogging/ Microblogging and Media Sharing: Periscope/ Meerkat/ Youtube/ Tumblr

Media Sharing: Instagram/ Pinterest/ Vine

Messaging: Messenger/ Kick/ Oovoo/ Snapchat/ Whatsapp

Gaming: Minecraft

Time to Talk:

The minimum age for most social media sites is 13. Why do you think this is?

We would love to hear your views on this topic, or outcomes as a result of trying out the suggestion above. Please send them to getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK here.

To access free body image teaching resources, click the button below.

Source: Media Smart Body Image and Advertising: a guide for parents and guardians

advertising

Advertising: when is an advert not an advert?

Advertising is everywhere but we are not always aware that we are been marketed to, as the parameters of what constitutes an advert have changed in the new digital age.

First, we need to know what adverts look like.

In the past adverts in the media were separated from the main editorial content. Adverts appeared in the space between newspaper/ magazine articles, or in the gaps between TV/radio programmes. It was easy to tell them apart. Today, adverts and editorial content can look very similar. On social media it can be really difficult to tell which is which. For example, adverts can now appear in games, before videos or even through celebrity endorsement.

Time to Talk

Ask your family to identify different types of advert (e.g. on social media, a search engine or in games). Discuss how they can tell the adverts are promoting something.

We would love to hear your views on this topic, or outcomes as a result of trying out the suggestion above. Please send them to getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK here.

To access free body image teaching resources, click the button below.

Source: Media Smart Body Image and Advertising: a guide for parents and guardians

Advertise

Why do companies advertise?

There is no definitive point of advertising. It is important that we understand the variety of reasons companies choose to advertise.

It seems obvious why companies advertise but, as with everything, there is more to it. Whether online or offline, successful advertising = more sales for a company. Advertising can also convince people to change brands, build loyalty to a particular brand and, ultimately, get people to pay more for products or services.

Not all advertising sells products and services – advertising can be used to share information (e.g. about our health), influence opinion (e.g. about building new things in our communities) or influence actions (e.g. promoting political parties and campaigns).

Time to talk

To start a discussion on why companies advertise, begin by thinking about the following question:

“On social media how much of the advertising is for sharing or for influencing opinion (e.g. justifying a higher price for their product), and how much of it is to encourage an action (e.g. changing brands)?”

Questioning adverts

When looking at an advert, it is useful to think about the questions advertisers have asked themselves before creating it. See below for more useful questions:

  1. What is the key message of the advert?
  2. What is the main subject of the advert?
  3. What problems are being solved by the advert, if any?
  4. What does the advert say about the company?
  5. What is the target market of the advert? (gender/age/interest/income)
  6. How does the advert make you initially feel?
  7. What are the key benefits being advertised?
  8. What is the advert asking the audience to do?

We would love to hear your views on this topic, send them to getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK here.

To access free body image teaching resources, click the button below.

Source: Media Smart Body Image and Advertising: a guide for parents and guardians

diversity

Diversity: The Whole Picture?

The diversity and size of the UK’s population is growing. Naturally, an increasing number of advertisements reflect this, and while there are those who think advertising should be required to reflect the UK’s ethnic mix more accurately, we think that advertisers should want to. It’s not only good for people, it’s good for business.

“The Whole Picture is the advertising industry’s response to changes in the ethnic profile of the UK. In this report we’ve attempted to reflect the views of a diverse population and give guidance to the industry on how best to reflect – and engage with – people from different backgrounds.” Karen Fraser, Director, Credos

But reflecting diversity in an accurate and meaningful way can be a challenge. This research, by advertising’s think tank Credos, hopes to shine a light on how advertisers can do just that. It asked people from different ethnic backgrounds what they currently think of diversity in UK advertising, and how we can work to improve it.

Qualitative research with 72 people, followed by a survey of 1,000 individuals informed the work, which found that:

  • Two-thirds of people surveyed – across a range of ethnicities – believe companies and brands have a duty to embrace diversity and represent it in their ads
  • In particular, people from ethnic minorities see the positioning of their culture in advertisements as a barometer for what society thinks
  • 57% of white respondents think advertising represent’s the UK’s multicultural society – and 45% of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) respondents agree
  • But BAMEs think advertising should try harder to portray them and their lives more realistically. A move towards more thoughtful and informed portrayals will improve representation, and help brands succeed with different audiences

Representation

The report unpacks findings across how Britain is changing, how people define identity, diversity in public life, why brands should care, reflections on UK advertising today, and how to talk about diversity. And you can read it all below.

Useful links –

Attachment –

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To find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK, or to access your free Body Image teaching resources, simply click the button below.

CREDIT: CREDOS (This article was first published on http://www.adassoc.org.uk/credos/, and is shared here with their permission.)

Show your support

You can show your support by retweeting our banner image and express your views about body image and media literacy by tweeting with the hashtag #OpenMyEyes to @vivoclass and @MediaSmartUK.

Join our body image and media literacy THUNDERCLAP!

If you are a primary school teacher we would appreciate you taking the time to fill out our evaluation form after using the educational resources. If you have any questions or extra feedback please don’t hesitate to contact us at getmediasmart@vivome.com.

body confidence

Body Confidence: Picture of Health?

Credos’ newest report – Picture of Health? – shines the spotlight on boys’ body confidence – an issue that affects young men as well as women.

This report focuses on the way male models are portrayed in advertising and the media – particularly, whether boys are aware of digitally enhanced imagery and whether this impacts their behaviour.

Credos surveyed 1,005 boys from primary and secondary schools around the country to explore their attitudes towards advertising and body image, and conducted focus groups of boys aged 8 to 18 and with teachers, youth leaders and parents to understand the roots, effects and solutions to boys body confidence.

body confidence

Picture of Health? is the latest in a series of reports on representation in advertising by Credos, and follows 2011’s Pretty as a Picture (on the effect of airbrushing in ads on women and young girls) and The Whole Picture? on ethnic diversity in advertising.

body confidence

You can find the full report below.

Attachments

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To find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK, or to access your free Body Image teaching resources, simply click the button below.

Source: Credos (This article was first published on http://adassoc.org.uk/credos/, and is shared here with their permission.)

Show your support

You can show your support by retweeting our banner image and express your views about body image and media literacy by tweeting with the hashtag #OpenMyEyes to @vivoclass and @MediaSmartUK.

Join our body image and media literacy THUNDERCLAP!

If you are a primary school teacher we would appreciate you taking the time to fill out our evaluation form after using the educational resources. If you have any questions or extra feedback please don’t hesitate to contact us at getmediasmart@vivome.com.

airbrushing

Airbrushing: Pretty as a Picture

What do young women in the UK really think of airbrushing? And what is its impact?

Following an increasing number of calls for changes to the way adverts represent models, we decided to find out what the consumers themselves think.

For this report Credos interviewed young women aged 10-18, and separately their mums, which was complemented by a survey of 1000 young women aged 10-21. These conversations gave us new insight – young women have a strong awareness of what ‘airbrushing’ means and its prevalence in advertising. Girls still place importance on appearance. But education about airbrushing helps girls interpret and decode the images they see in ads. What is more, they tend to favour more natural images in advertising, and trust brands that heavily airbrush less.

This report is injecting some real world relevance to airbrushing conversations between industry, opinion makers, and politicians. The ad industry is facing this challenge head on. A responsible approach to airbrushing and increased diversity in advertising is needed.

The report has been well received in both industry and politics. Various brands and agencies have incorporated the results into their work, while Lynne Featherstone MP has even taken the report to the UN in New York.

Attachment –

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To find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK, or to access your free Body Image teaching resources, simply click the button below.

Source: Credos (This article was first published on http://www.adassoc.org.uk/credos/, and is shared here with their permission.)

Show your support

You can show your support by retweeting our banner image and express your views about body image and media literacy by tweeting with the hashtag #OpenMyEyes to @vivoclass and @MediaSmartUK.

Join our body image and media literacy THUNDERCLAP!

If you are a primary school teacher we would appreciate you taking the time to fill out our evaluation form after using the educational resources. If you have any questions or extra feedback please don’t hesitate to contact us at getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Students

Can Students Learn How to be Happy? Science Says Yes.

What if happiness isn’t an end? What if it isn’t something to aspire to and build up towards, but a vital component of learning – a starting point? What if, by assuming that success drives happiness and not the other way around, we are reducing our potential for both? There is increasing scientific consensus that cultivating a happy and positive mindset is key to unleashing the power of our brains. Furthermore, there is evidence to show that it can be learned by students like any other skill.

“Happiness depends upon ourselves” – Aristotle

Is it time for schools to put happiness first?

This paper will explore three questions:

(1) Are young people happy in 2016?

(2) Can happiness drive success?

AND

(3) Can happiness be learned?

Then we will investigate ways that schools can put happiness first – looking at specific case studies.

Read More…

student motivation

Student Motivation and Self-Reflective Learning

When talking about student motivation, we like to think in terms of “inspiration” rather than “motivation”.

The online world is giving students access to valuable educational content that they might otherwise miss out on. Content that’s extra-curricular but useful is now available at the click of a few buttons – all the things teachers would love to teach but don’t have the time to do so in class due to the demands of mainstream learning.

Read More…

Character Building: the Real Goal of Education?

“Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education. The complete education gives one not only power of concentration but worthy objectives upon which to concentrate.” – Martin Luther King Jr, ‘The purpose of education’. In recent years, character building has been emphasised in education from primary school all the way up to further education and beyond. Producing students with good morals, ‘soft skills’ and ‘skills for life’ is magnified as an important aim of teaching. In practice, facilitating both character building exercises as well as the national curriculum is a difficult juggling act. One element often falls by the wayside and there is not a clear way of countering the imbalance. More often than not, character education is the forgotten element.

Read More…