body confidence

Body Confidence: Picture of Health?

Credos’ newest report – Picture of Health? – shines the spotlight on boys’ body confidence – an issue that affects young men as well as women.

This report focuses on the way male models are portrayed in advertising and the media – particularly, whether boys are aware of digitally enhanced imagery and whether this impacts their behaviour.

Credos surveyed 1,005 boys from primary and secondary schools around the country to explore their attitudes towards advertising and body image, and conducted focus groups of boys aged 8 to 18 and with teachers, youth leaders and parents to understand the roots, effects and solutions to boys body confidence.

body confidence

Picture of Health? is the latest in a series of reports on representation in advertising by Credos, and follows 2011’s Pretty as a Picture (on the effect of airbrushing in ads on women and young girls) and The Whole Picture? on ethnic diversity in advertising.

body confidence

You can find the full report below.

Attachments

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To find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK, or to access your free Body Image teaching resources, simply click the button below.

Source: Credos (This article was first published on http://adassoc.org.uk/credos/, and is shared here with their permission.)

Show your support

You can show your support by retweeting our banner image and express your views about body image and media literacy by tweeting with the hashtag #OpenMyEyes to @vivoclass and @MediaSmartUK.

Join our body image and media literacy THUNDERCLAP!

If you are a primary school teacher we would appreciate you taking the time to fill out our evaluation form after using the educational resources. If you have any questions or extra feedback please don’t hesitate to contact us at getmediasmart@vivome.com.

airbrushing

Airbrushing: Pretty as a Picture

What do young women in the UK really think of airbrushing? And what is its impact?

Following an increasing number of calls for changes to the way adverts represent models, we decided to find out what the consumers themselves think.

For this report Credos interviewed young women aged 10-18, and separately their mums, which was complemented by a survey of 1000 young women aged 10-21. These conversations gave us new insight – young women have a strong awareness of what ‘airbrushing’ means and its prevalence in advertising. Girls still place importance on appearance. But education about airbrushing helps girls interpret and decode the images they see in ads. What is more, they tend to favour more natural images in advertising, and trust brands that heavily airbrush less.

This report is injecting some real world relevance to airbrushing conversations between industry, opinion makers, and politicians. The ad industry is facing this challenge head on. A responsible approach to airbrushing and increased diversity in advertising is needed.

The report has been well received in both industry and politics. Various brands and agencies have incorporated the results into their work, while Lynne Featherstone MP has even taken the report to the UN in New York.

Attachment –

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To find out more about our #OpenMyEyes Campaign in collaboration with Media Smart UK, or to access your free Body Image teaching resources, simply click the button below.

Source: Credos (This article was first published on http://www.adassoc.org.uk/credos/, and is shared here with their permission.)

Show your support

You can show your support by retweeting our banner image and express your views about body image and media literacy by tweeting with the hashtag #OpenMyEyes to @vivoclass and @MediaSmartUK.

Join our body image and media literacy THUNDERCLAP!

If you are a primary school teacher we would appreciate you taking the time to fill out our evaluation form after using the educational resources. If you have any questions or extra feedback please don’t hesitate to contact us at getmediasmart@vivome.com.

Students

Can Students Learn How to be Happy? Science Says Yes.

What if happiness isn’t an end? What if it isn’t something to aspire to and build up towards, but a vital component of learning – a starting point? What if, by assuming that success drives happiness and not the other way around, we are reducing our potential for both? There is increasing scientific consensus that cultivating a happy and positive mindset is key to unleashing the power of our brains. Furthermore, there is evidence to show that it can be learned by students like any other skill.

“Happiness depends upon ourselves” – Aristotle

Is it time for schools to put happiness first?

This paper will explore three questions:

(1) Are young people happy in 2016?

(2) Can happiness drive success?

AND

(3) Can happiness be learned?

Then we will investigate ways that schools can put happiness first – looking at specific case studies.

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Primary Tests

Primary Tests, Basic Skills and Mental Health

In 2014, gov.uk published a press release stating that “new primary tests will help eradicate illiteracy and innumeracy”. Literacy and numeracy in England became a key concern after a 2012 OECD survey found that current standards were unacceptable. Based on the survey’s findings, the OECD recommended that students “with low basic skills should not normally enter three-year undergraduate programmes.” In addition to these findings, a survey of 291 companies and 1.5 million employees showed that 85% of businesses felt that there needed to be more focus on literacy and numeracy at primary schools in England.

Primary tests and tougher exams

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pastoral care

Effective Pastoral Care in Schools

Why does pastoral care matter?

Pastoral care involves teaching and providing opportunities for young people to grow in their self-esteem, confidence, and independence of thought. This facilitates the development of their personal, social and emotional intelligence.

The quality of pastoral care influences the ethos and tone of the whole school and is, therefore, extremely important when creating an atmosphere in which young people can feel secure and achieve.

Pastoral care in schools can be considered ‘effective’ when the following is evident:

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EU referendum

EU Referendum Poll: The Results

Last month, we decided to run a poll on the EU referendum to engage students and teachers in an issue of great importance. We wanted to approach the debate in an unbiased fashion and simply ask what they thought in an anonymous poll.

We held the student vote on Vivo Edge – our platform for students. On Vivo Edge, we engage students in fun and informative content, geared towards providing them with a context to understand their place in the world. You can read the original article here.

We heard back from 4000+ students and teachers. We’re proud to provide a platform for so many people to have their say.

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student motivation

Student Motivation and Self-Reflective Learning

When talking about student motivation, we like to think in terms of “inspiration” rather than “motivation”.

The online world is giving students access to valuable educational content that they might otherwise miss out on. Content that’s extra-curricular but useful is now available at the click of a few buttons – all the things teachers would love to teach but don’t have the time to do so in class due to the demands of mainstream learning.

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Character Building: the Real Goal of Education?

“Intelligence plus character – that is the goal of true education. The complete education gives one not only power of concentration but worthy objectives upon which to concentrate.” – Martin Luther King Jr, ‘The purpose of education’. In recent years, character building has been emphasised in education from primary school all the way up to further education and beyond. Producing students with good morals, ‘soft skills’ and ‘skills for life’ is magnified as an important aim of teaching. In practice, facilitating both character building exercises as well as the national curriculum is a difficult juggling act. One element often falls by the wayside and there is not a clear way of countering the imbalance. More often than not, character education is the forgotten element.

Read More…